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Antibiotic Resistance Panel For Urine

St. Jude Labs
SKU: SJL0027

$350.00 per test

The Antibiotic Resistance Panel for Urine test will identify which antibiotics will effectively treat a urine infection. This test looks at specific genetic codes of drug resistance markers and inform which treatment would be most effective.

The Antibiotic Resistance Panel for Urine test will identify which antibiotics will effectively treat a urine infection. This test looks at specific genetic codes of drug resistance markers and inform which treatment would be most effective.

The Fine Print

Antibiotic-resistant infections are often more difficult to cure and more expensive to treat. Today’s healthcare insurance companies may, at times, limit a provider’s ability to order an antibiotic resistance panel with every microbiologic culture, such as a wound, urine, or throat culture. While frequently the healthcare provider does order the correct antibiotic to treat a given infection, sometimes the prescribed antibiotics do not work and the infection can linger or worsen.

The test looks at specific genetic markers associated with drug resistance and provides the drug resistance marker profile with molecular diagnostics. Unlike many conventional laboratory tests, molecular genetic testing provides exceptional specificity and accuracy, leading to timely diagnosis and effective, personalized treatments.

Sample type:  Urine

Turn around Time:  2-3 days from receipt of sample at lab

This test can identify the following antibiotic resistance markers:

  • Temoniera-β-lactamase (TEM)
  • Sulfhydryl Variable-β-lactamase  (SHV)
  • Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)
  • CefoTaXime-M-β-lactamase (CTXM 1)
  • CefoTaXime-M-β-lactamase (CTXM 2)
  • CefoTaXime-M-β-lactamase (CTXM 8)
  • CefoTaXime-M-β-lactamase (CTXM 9)
  • CefoTaXime-M-β-lactamase (CTXM 25)
  • New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM)
  • Verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamase (VIM)
  • Verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamase (VIM 7)
  • Verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamase (VIM 13)
  • Cephamycinase (CMY 1)
  • Cephamycinase (CMY 2)
  • Cefoxitin-Hydrolyzing Class C-β-lactamase (FOX)
  • Oxacillinase Group (OXA 1)
  • Oxacillinase Group (OXA 2)
  • Oxacillinase Group (OXA 48)
  • Methicillin Resistance (mecA)
  • Sulfonamide-Resistant isolate (Sul 1)
  • Sulfonamide-Resistant isolate (Sul 2)
  • Sulfonamide-Resistant isolate (Sul 3)
  • Erythromycin Resistance Gene (ermB)
  • Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Determinant (qnrA 1)
  • Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Determinant (qnrB 1)
  • Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Determinant (qnrB 5)
  • Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Determinant (qnrS)
  • Vancomycin Resistance (Van A)
  • Vancomycin Resistance (Van B)
  • Vancomycin Resistance (VanC 1)
  • Vancomycin Resistance (VanC 2-4)

What is a CLIA certified laboratory?

The Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) regulate laboratory testing and require clinical laboratories to be certified by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) before they can accept human samples for diagnostic testing. (Accessible at: https://www.fda.gov/medical-devices/ivd-regulatory-assistance/clinical-laboratory-improvement-amendments-clia).

Is this test FDA approved?

Laboratory Developed Tests (LDT) do not require FDA approval if they are developed using CLIA policies.  This test is analytically validated in accordance with the CLIA Guidance Document (Policy for Diagnostics Testing in Laboratories Certified to Perform High Complexity Testing) as a Laboratory Developed Test (LDT) by St Jude Laboratories, LLC.  Therefore, it has not been cleared or approved by the FDA.

NOTE: This test cannot be offered in the state of New York, USA.

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